Tag Archives: family

Writing Life: “Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll”

Today’s post comes from my friend Jade Bennett over at Jade Bennett Writes. Who also, if you hadn’t heard, launched her IndieGoGo campaign today!  She’s aiming to raise money to self-publish her first novel Mechanics of Magic, the first in a series titled Mechanical Maladies.  Check her out, and if you support her cause, please donate or share her IndieGoGo page!  Thanks, everyone!

Now, about Writing Life.

I’ve spoken on the topic of saying what you mean to say, how you mean to say it, multiple times, and this post isn’t going to change that tune.  I’ve been asked by several people why I choose to portray controversial subjects in my writing, how I approach those topics, and how I deal with the “backlash.”

Truth?  I’ve never really had any backlash.  I own what I write, and if people don’t like it, they can go complain on the internet.  (You know, like I do all the time.  You guys know.  =P)  If something means a lot to you, and you want to put that down on paper, that’s your call.  Gaining the courage to show the world is an entirely different matter.

Let’s face it: a stranger’s opinion is the difference between the cost of one book in our pocket and one less digit on our sales sheet, and that’s big.  But not as big as how we feel about, say, our mother reading that gay romance novel we wrote, chock full of drug abuse, rape, and our main character’s struggle to get by in an anti-equality society.  Or our father running across our heart-rending essays on teen suicide or our flash fiction about parental alcoholism.

It doesn’t matter.  I swear to you, write what you’re passionate about.  It may not be pretty and it may cause some controversy, but that’s okay.  Our modern world was built on controversy.  Voices rise and things change, but if we keep silent, we’re stagnant.  Even if it’s in your fiction, in a small, indirect way, say what you mean.  Even if it’s through your characters in a fictional realm on a fictional planet, address those things that call to your heart because only you can say them the way you intend them to be said.

Stand up.  Your friends and families will judge you.  Strangers will judge you.  But at least you can say that you stood for something.  So few people see what courage there is in writing fiction.

Be blunt.  You don’t have to be crass, but be honest.  If it’s not honesty from your perspective, be honest from an opposite perspective.  Fiction always displays at least two sides, if not always evenly.

Moral of the story?  Don’t be afraid to write about the hard things in life.  Your family may not approve, but you’ll be a voice for so many people who stand beside you.   More than you might realize.  Don’t let fear silence you. <3

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The Marvelous Misadventures of Mad Madigan!

BEHOLD, READERS!  The fearsome Mad Madigan!

Mad Madigan

She turns people to stone with her stare!

Fear her!  Safeguard your children!  Swords at the ready!

Fearsome Maddie

But, seriously, what's the point? Look at those teeth. You should probably just run.

Madigan spares no one!  (EventhoughmymothercallsherMaddie…. augh, cuteness. =_=; )  This is me giving you a head start.  Blood is hard to clean out of the internet, and Madigan is very messy when she slaughters the innocent. <3

Welcome home to Mad Madigan!

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Writing Life: It’s Okay to be Human

Through the Woods

Find your inner "happy place." Image © will wilson *

Writing is an art.  You read, write, research, and observe to hone your craft; work yourself dizzy trying to make every word in every sentence in every paragraph just perfect.  We toil, we cry, we let our index fingers hover threateningly over the “delete” key, after an angry ctrl+a….  But we recoil, and we do because, no matter how much we cry, we still love what we do.  I’m here today to tell you:

It’s okay to be human.

We all have lives, jobs, and families that continue buzzing about as we sit with our backs to the world, trying to allot our novel some love before the high-pitched screaming toddler in the background will eventually require a diaper change.  We love our novels, but it’s okay to love the rest of our lives, too, because, I repeat:

It’s okay to be human.

Our pets need feeding, our spouses need reassuring, our bills need paying, our lives need livingWriting is important to you, and you want to do it well.  Everyone will tell you that you need to write to improve your craft.  You need to write and read and research and write some more– and they’re right!  But you’ll never improve your writing with your face on your keyboard in a puddle of your own tears, sobbing over those four pages your child lost when she gave the keyboard a swat.

Go to your happy place.  If you have to sacrifice ten minutes of writing for your own mental health and inner quiet, would you really consider that a set back?  Your writing will improve when your state of mind improves.  I don’t know about you, but the more stressed I get, the worse I feel, the less likely I am to write anything worthwhile.  I forget to eat, my brain stops functioning, I get dizzy and irritable and prone to tears and rude outbursts.  Take a breath.  Take a walk.  Read something for fun instead of for the sake of picking apart storytelling strategy.  Have a glass of water to rehydrate yourself.  Remember:

It’s okay to be human.

How can you create humanity in your writing if you don’t allow a bit for yourself?

 

How do you deal with stress?  Do you have a “happy place” or a de-stressing routine?  How do you find silence in your every day life?

 

Flickr Photo: Will Wilson

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